Every day I talk, write and comment about the “Cloud”. Every time I mention the cloud I try to make sure that I add the name of the relevant cloud operator, “Rackspace Cloud, “MS Cloud” (Azure) or “HP Cloud”. Somehow all of these cloud titles don’t right to me – it seems the only title that really works for me is the “Amazon Cloud”. In this post, I will elaborate about the competition in the IaaS market and I will explain further why I think this is so.

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cloud-connectLast week I attended one of the most popular cloud technology conferences in the world – CloudConnect. The CloudConnect conference started about four years ago. Attending the event gave me a clear understanding of the market maturity and evolution rhythm. Check out the following sections for the main points on what I heard and learned:

Cloud Performance

The underlying infrastructure performance, round trip time, bandwidth, caching and rendering are to be counted as the major features of an online service performance. In an interesting presentation by @joeweinman (known by his famous “Cloudonomics” theory), it was claimed that latency holds the greatest weight among these faetures. I encourage you to check out his new research – As Time Goes By: The Law of Cloud Response Time presents some good formulas, methods and considerations with regards to online services’ performance and latency (including simple facts, for example, that people tend to prefer selecting from fewer options on an online page –  so you can have less content on a page and achieve a better browsing performance).

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On a vacation you often find that the best way to enjoy is to try and disconnect from the regular working day routine. Part of my blogging tasks include searching for knowledge resources and publishing news and articles to my followers. I maintain communication with my readers using social communication means such as Twitter and LinkedIn. Setting that in semi-automated state with twaitter (so I can spend my time with my lovely wife and not with my iPad …) brought me to imagine a living, breathing independent cloud creature that “feeds” itself with information.

Think out of the box and try to imagine the possibility that these lines were written by a smart algorithm utilizing the clouds and their enormous amount of information and logic. Imagine that humans don’t have keyboards but only screens to view what the “intelligent cloud creature” generates using smart BI algorithms running on a complex extremely wide integration. As we speak this integration is sprawling; basic logic routines and cross systems flows developed by humans as well as by machines.

The question “what I would like to eat for lunch ?” can be based on enormous amount of considerations such as who you are, who is connected to you, what you have already eaten today and how it fits with your diet, as well as what your best friend would like to eat because he can join you today while visiting nearby. All of these answers and more are already out there. The enormous growth in the number and the size of apps’ eco-systems, Big Data and the robust physical computing capabilities of the cloud leads to a form of intensive information calculation that can generate accurate intelligent results in an adaptive manner.

Traditional IT systems and logic were confined within their on-premise domain of variables. Collaboration wasn’t really an option and integration was (and still is) always a painful point with respect to huge investments and high risks. API deveopment task was one of the last things on the ISV priorities list. Today things can be different thanks to these clouds. The cloud accelerates the extension of eco-systems and can makes this fantasy a reality. I believe that we are heading straight into a second, even more exciting information technology revolution.

“Ask Siri to do things just by talking the way you talk. Siri understands what you say, knows what you mean, and even talks back. Siri is so easy to use and does so much, you’ll keep finding more and more ways to use it.”

The first time I checked this IPA (Intelligent Personal Assistant) agent was about less than two years ago. I was fascinated by the fact that besides the voice recognition and ease of use, Siri aims to generate its own intelligence using its great eco-system environment to generate suggestions and solve problems in a proactive and self-improvement manner. Eventually, I wasn’t surprised to hear that the most innovative company in the world integrated the solution inside its leading product operating system (I am just waiting for them to stop playing around and release it as part of the iOS, not only for the 4S version).

Another noteworthy example is Boomi. The company that was bought by Dell a year ago is a growing business for out-of-the-box “connectors” (the term they use for their integration widgets) platform. 

“Remember Data Integration is the key to the cloudy future. By having Boomi in its pocket, Dell is well positioned to handle these needs” wrote the cloud evangelist Krishnan Subramanian, in his article Quick Thoughts: Dell Acquires Boomi

I had a great discussion with Rick Nucci, Founder and CTO of Boomi regarding the company’s positioning and its strategy to become the heart of the enterprise business flow. The company’s offering enables the IT Organization to generate a full solution assembled from several systems. The company develops a platform that enables rapid provisioning of “connectors” that enable systems. 

“AtomSphere connects providers and customers of SaaS, cloud and on-premise applications via a pure SaaS integration platform that does not require software or appliances. .. Leading SaaS players and enterprise customers such as salesforce.com, NetSuite, RightNow, Marketo, Taleo, Zuora, Coupa, NASDAQ” Read more on Boomi’s site

Utilizing the cloud the company is able to host and maintain all of its customers’ connectors in its own cloud environment. The company takes responsibility for the connectors’ compatibly and provision them as a SaaS with a SLA. The traditional integration maintenance hassle becomes a small issue. SaaS start-ups are focusing on solving a specific problem and by so doing will not be able to solve a complete business flow. I believe that vendors such as Boomi can be positioned on top of the cloud food chain (I love that term – I encourage you to use it and comment what do you think about it), even before some of the above SaaS providers.

Traditional ISV must take action in regards to its eco-systems, both those it owns and those it participates in. Traditional ISVs have vast experience and owns data and logic that can be utilized by the new and agile SaaS developer. The ISV can leverage this experience in the cloud and take strategic steps to increase its public interface services to extend its eco-system and generate additional revenue stream. 

> > > > > Back to Reality

Without the crowd input, the user collaboration and the contribution of the fast running web developer the cloud content, systems integration and eco-system can not evolve and grow. The next IT revolution combined from the connected world and big data is just outside knocking on our door and it lies on top of a rapid pace of cloud innovations and evolution.

> > > Don’t forget to comment – What are the layers of the “cloud food chain” ? < < <

Last week I was invited to the HP Tech Day in HP’s campus in Houston to learn and hear more about the giant’s cloud offering. I appreciate HP and Ivy very much for the invitation and for a great event where I was able to learn more and see these clouds in real. I had the privilege to meet savvy and professional guys. It is always great to see people who are enthusiastic on their jobs and are proud of their company. Let me share with you HP’s cloud from my point of view.

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The IaaS Management Market: Evolution, Vendors and More
A lot has already been said about the false cloud use where the IaaS platform utilized as an hosting extension of the IT organization’s data center and not taking advantage of the elasticity benefits to generate a cost effective and scalable IT operation. Using the public IaaS whether it is...Read more

It always good to start with Wikipedia’s definition as it helps to initiate a structured discussion, here is Wiki’s definition for Lock-In:

“In economics, vendor lock-in, also known as proprietary lock-in or customer lock-in, makes a customer dependent on a vendor for products and services, unable to use another vendor without substantial switching costs. Lock-in costs which create barriers to market entry may result in antitrust action against a monopoly.” Read more on Wikipedia

Does the cloud present a major lock-in ? Does the move create substantial switching costs?

“Yes !” is the common answer I hear for those questions. In this article I will debate it basing my findings on real cloud adoption cases.

Generally in terms of cloud’s lock-in, we face the same issues as in the traditional world where the move includes re-implementation of the IT service. It involves issues such as data portability, users guidance and training, integration, etc.

“I think we’ve officially lost the war on defining the core attributes of cloud computing so that businesses and IT can make proper use of it. It’s now in the hands of marketing organizations and PR firms who, I’m sure, will take the concept on a rather wild ride over the next few years.”

The above statement I bring from David Linthicum’s article “It’s official: ‘Cloud computing’ is now meaningless”. Due to my full consent with Linthicum on that matter, I will be accurate and try to make a clear assessment of the cloud lock-in issue by relating each of the three cloud layers (i.e. IPS aaS) separately.

In this part, I will relate to the most lower layer, the IaaS lock-in.

It is a fact that IT organizations take advantage of the IaaS platforms by moving part or even all of their physical resources to the public clouds. Furthermore, ISVs move at least their test and development environments and making serious plans to move (or already moved) part of their production environment to the public clouds.

Read more about shifting legacy systems to the cloud by Ben Kepes

Discussing with a public IaaS consumers, it always come to the point where I ask “do you feel locked on your cloud vendor ?” most, if not all of the companies’ leaders claim that the public clouds’ values (on-demand, elastic, agility,ect) overcomes the lock-in impact so they are willing to compromise. As a cloud enthusiastic it is great for me to see the industry leaders’ positive approach towards moving their businesses to the cloud (again too general – any of them refer to a different layer). I do not think that the lock-in is so serious.

For sometime this claim sounded pretty reasonable to me though on second thought I find that the discussion should start from a comparison with the traditional data center “locks”. Based on this comparison I can already state that one of the major public cloud advantages is the weak lock-in, simply because you don’t buy hardware. Furthermore, companies that still use the public cloud as an hosting extension to their internal data center, don’t acquire new (long term or temporary) assets that they can’t get rid of without having a major loss. In regards to its lock-in the public cloud is great !

Another important explanation related specifically to Amazon AWS products which support SaaS scalability and operations. Smart SaaS architect will plan the cloud integration layer, so that the application logic and workflow will be strongly tied with the underlying IaaS capabilities such as on-demand resources auto provisioning.

Read more about the relationship between web developers and the cloud

For example, the web can use the cloud integration layer to get on-demand EC2 resources for a specific point when a complex calculation occurs. In a superficial glance, the fact that the cloud API used as a part of the application run-time script holds an enormous lock-in risks. I disagree and let me explain why.

As a market leader, Amazon AWS will be (already is) followed by other IaaS vendors. Those will solve the same scalability and operational issues by the same sense and logic of AWS. Basically this means an evolution of IaaS platform standards. Smart cloud integration layer will enable “plug & play” a different IaaS platform or even orchestrate several in parallel. To strengthen my point I bring as an example several cloud start-ups (solving IaaS issues such as governance, usage and security) that developed their product to solve issues for Amazon AWS consumers and seriously target support of other IaaS vendors’ platforms such as Rackspace cloud and vCloud. In regards to lock-in the public cloud is great !

The IaaS vendors in the market recognize the common lock-in drawback of moving to the cloud. Vendors such as Rackspace brings the OpenStack which is a cloud software platform, so cloud vendors can build IaaS solutions upon it. Rackspace showing off on their blog site –

OpenStack™ is a massively scalable cloud operating system, powering the world’s leading clouds. Backed by more than 50 participating organizations, OpenStack is quickly becoming the industry standard for public and private clouds. Read More

It should be noted that applications and data switching between clouds is still complex and in some cases not feasible though believing in the public cloud’s future comes with understanding of its weak lock-in and will lead to visionary and long term strategic plans.

What about the private IaaS ?

Following my on going research on what is the best cloud option (i.e public, private or hybrid), I found that outsourcing the IT environment to a private or an hybrid includes a major lock-in. Implementation of a private or an hybrid cloud includes lots of customization, hence lack of standards. Private and Hybrid clouds have their benefits though lock-in is not one of them. The contract with the vendor is for 3 to 5 years at least (a data center’s typical depreciation period) on a non standard environment leads to an extreme, long term lock-in in terms of the “on-demand world”.

In order to decrease lock-in the IaaS consumer must prove the organization need for a private cloud by planning strategically for long term. Besides the ordinary due diligence to prove the vendor strength, the contract must include termination points and creative ideas that can weaken the lock-in. For example renewal of initial contract under re-assessing of the service standards, costs and terms in comparison with the cloud market, including the public one. The private cloud vendor must prove on-going efficiency improvements and costs reductions accordingly.

In his article Keep the ‘Cloud’ User in Charge”, Mark Bohannon, VP at Red Hat, Warns:

by vendors to lock in their customers to particular cloud architecture and non-portable solutions, and heavy reliance on proprietary APIs. Lock-in drives costs higher and undermines the savings that can be achieved through technical efficiency. If not carefully managed, we risk taking steps backwards, even going toward replicating the 1980s, where users were heavily tied technologically and financially into one IT framework and were stuck there.”

Some of the private cloud offering today have similar characteristics as the traditional data center, to me it seems that the former comes with a stronger lock-in impacts. In case of an IT transition companies who decide to go that way should expect a considerable switching costs and long term recovery of their IT operations hence of their business.

The second part will discuss the cloud lock-in characteristics in regards to the SaaS and the PaaS layers.

The three layers of cloud computing IaaS, PaaS and SaaS occupy the headlines with significant capabilities undergo continuous improvement to host services in the cloud. This growing market is slowly changing so that offered services will become generic. The current evolving struggle is the deployment and management of SaaS applications in the cloud, Gartner calls this cloud market portion SEAP (Software Enabled Application Platforms). We will dare to say that developers are from Mars and cloud providers from Venus, let us explain in detail why.

SaaS application developer builds the application architecture structure including the database system, the business logic and the user Interface. The software developer (or the SaaS vendor for that matter) invests on building these main three infrastructure cornerstones in order to bring life to the business idea and launch a new on-line service.

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Joe Weinman is well known in the cloud computing community as the founder of Cloudonomics. Presenting complex simulation tools, Weinman characterizes the sometimes counterintuitive business, financial, and user experience benefits of cloud computing including its on-demand, pay-per-use and other buisness aspects. Last month I had the pleasure of participating in Weinman’s webinar. Weinman discussed several interesting points which I would like to share with you.

Weinman started by contradicting what seem to be the fundamental assumptions regarding the Cloud and its benefits. There was nothing radical about what I heard but it made me think and challenge all the things I took for granted –

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Three months ago I started this LinkedIn discussion and I keep getting comments about it. People might say that it is just a defiant question for marketing purposes. I say that this question raises many thoughts and opinions that helps marking the strategy of an IT organization. I invite you to read the following comments that can bring you to think a bit more about your current On-Demand strategy and approach.

> > > > > Answer #1: Just a Buzzword

It’s a buzzword. This is a 70’s-80’s technologies evolution. Remember mainframes, VM/370, per-time payments when using machine. Just another evolutionary loop, development of already existent technologies. In my opinion Cloud computing is an evolution. Started with the revolution of Grid computing, then Utility computing, SAAS computing and now it finds its preliminary conclusion in Cloud computing. Thus no it is not a revolution, it is a revolutionary step in the evolution of what is now called Cloud computing. This is just a good name for number of technologies that was ready years before than customers are become ready for it and useful software was written. Many companies added “Cloud” to the titles of their solutions. Any site can be marked “Cloud ready” or “SaaS solution” 🙂 It means that it’s only marketing. This all is possible because people don’t know what Cloud is in details; sellers often talk about it as about some magic. You can use Magic instead of Cloud; meaning stays the same – marketing.

> > > > > Answer #2 : Depends! From the technology perspective: Evolution and from the business point: Revolution

“From a technology point of view I am pretty positive about categorizing it as evolution and not even sure if representing a significant step; from a business standpoint however I think there is much more value in the concept. I believe that Cloud Computing introduces a capability to rapidly map dynamic changes in the business models that is kind of revolutionary

“My observation is that “cloud” is a description of how IT is supposed to work from a business perspective: flexible, available, efficient (lower cost), secure, dynamic, responsive, etc. If you are an IT specialist, the technology is evolutionary, but the thinking may be revolutionary.”

“I tend to think that the cloud computing Revolution will transform the way all businesses interface include enterprises with technology and communications, and marks the next wave of the fundamental changes that the evolution of the internet has already brought about the Tera Play

> > > > > Answer #3: IaaS just an Evolution. Massive Scaling, supported by PaaS and SaaS, is the Revolution.

“I’ve seen global Trading and risk systems, (30,000 node compute grids, nano second trading platforms), some true cutting edge platforms. And this is really a complete transformation of IT. If you’re thinking just IaaS then it’s just evolutionary. True SaaS and PaaS is a revolution. The fact that Salesforce (and the force.com platform) can deliver millions of users and 97500 customers on a single multi-tenant platform with three major upgrades per year. That’s the power of the cloud. Giving a small 10 user non-profit the same reach and scale as a multibillion dollar organisation. The cloud. No admin or maintenance, pure development and software business process IP. What other technology can scale from 1 to 100,000 users. It can take much less than 10% of the traditional development to build a SaaS app compared to traditional platforms. Cheaper , faster AND better . That’s a revolution.

“The prior comment reflects a deep misunderstanding about what timeshared (outsourced) mainframe computing was all about. Cloud is just another swing in the pendulum. The business owners in the 60’s were right: why should we buy and maintain our own computers when we can better spend the money by renting the computing resources from somebody who knows how to take care of all that “stuff”? It’s not new. We’re just coming around to the fact that PC computing set the industry back 40 years and we’re now where we would have been if PCs had not taken 25 years to “grow up”.

As amorphous as this question might be, the analogy to mainframes is highly misplaced and not very useful. Among other defining characteristics, cloud services allow software developers to control infrastructure resources programmatically. This means that applications specifically designed for cloud environments can bypass the historically slow and error prone layer of IT administrators that maintain computing resources through largely manual, error prone processes. Companies that use such functionality to enable auto-scaling, such as Netflix, are doing so without the need to invest capital into stranded computing capacity that may or may be fully subscribed. I’ll leave the ever so important question of evolution vs. revolution to you, but explain to me how the Netflix development team could have replicated their

“Revolution – Cloud is a disruption of everything internet and application as we know them. The very large infrastructure and service vendors are racing to rework their offers and slow things down to keep their competitive advantage. Revolutions are messy – like a massive earthquake or coup d etat. Evolution is what you study afterwards when learning which creatures adapted and which went extinct.”

> > > > > Revolution by Wikipedia takes place in a short period of time

“According to the Wikipedia definition: A revolution (from the Latin revolutio, “a turnaround”) is a fundamental change in power or organizational structures that takes place in a relatively short period of time. So how this aligned with the “Cloud Computing Revolution” that doesn’t seem to come up in a short period of time?… I remind you that Amazon started its AWS 11 years ago… ” I asked

“Ofir – most revolutions have a long lead up time where the angst ferments underground and bursts out in a moment of time when the underlying ability to organize action is catalyzed by some event – Egypt for example (mobile devices & Facebook). Think of the internet revolution in 1995-1997. The internet was slowly building out (DARPA net, etc) with organization by the scientific/defense communities and catalyzed by Tim Berner Lee public gift of http/html. The corporate world was seeking a way to collaborate beyond the bonds of one company’s offer, like IBM & MSFT. Within two years the Internet exploded into the corporate world, literally revolutionizing the ways companies marketed themselves. The coup was over when Bill Gates announced that Msft was an Internet company and Netscape dropped $25 in a day!”

This month Christian Verstraete, HP’s Chief Technologist also raised this question in the CIO magazine. In his post he writes:

“One of the questions that came on the table was whether cloud computing is a revolution, a paradigm shift, or not. I’d like to answer, it’s both.

I say that the cloud computing is Evolving faster to become a Revolution,

what do you think ? Join the discussion

> > > > >   Market Overview and Definitions 

According to Gartner’s PaaS Road Map report, cloud-based solutions will grow at a faster rate than on-premises solutions. By 2015, 50% of all ISVs will be SaaS providers. Most enterprises will hold major part of their business applications running on the cloud computing infrastructure, using PaaS and SaaS technologies directly or indirectly.

It is confusing to describe PaaS as one category as there are different values presented by the different ISVs whom developing and delivering solutions on different layers. Gartner’s report lets categorize the market of PaaS into the following 3 layers –

  1.  Application platform as a service (aPaaS) – providing a complete application platform that is used by the actual application’s components (those which support the business process) or by its APIs. Business-level power users and developers gain speed-to-market and the ability to focus on bringing their expertise to the business process layer rather than having to build the whole application infrastructure.
  2. Software infrastructure as a service (SIaaS) – those services provide management for software parts such as online cloudy database, integration and messaging. This layer is similar to the previous layer as it provides the development tools to build an application in the cloud, but it’s targeted at developers rather than business-level power user.
  3. Cloud enabled application Platform (CEAP)  – Software middle-ware tothat support the public and private cloud characteristics including monitoring, complexity management, scaling and optimization.

There’s been a veritable explosion of platform-as-a-service choices coming onto the market in the past month or two, and the pace of introductions is accelerating.

During the next two years, today’s segmented PaaS offering market will begin to consolidate into coalition of services targeting the prevailing use patterns for PaaS. Making use of such reintegrated, targeted suites will be a more attractive proposition than the burdensome traditional on-premises assembly of middleware capabilities in support of a project. By 2015, comprehensive PaaS suites will be designed to deliver a combination of all specialized forms of PaaS in one integrated offering.

> > > > >   PaaS Providers and Products —

There are several well-known PaaS providers such as GoogleApps, Heroku,  Microsoft Azure  and of course Force.com, the most mature and rich PaaS for those who want to build a classic forms-and-database SaaS application in the “old” Salesforce.com fashion.

“We don’t spend any time talking about the acronyms,” Andy Jassy, senior vice president of AWS, told eWEEK. “All those lines will get blurred over time. It’s a construct to box people in and it fits some stack paradigm. We started with raw storage, raw compute, and raw database in SimpleDB. And we’ve added load balancing, a relational database, Hadoop and Elastic Map reduce, a management GUI… All those lines start to get blurred, and you can expect to see additional abstraction from us.” Read more on eWeek

 SpringSource (by VMWare) –  Cloud Foundry, VMWare PaaS offering works with a variety of development frameworks and languages, application services and cloud deployment environments. It includes the SpringSource Framework, an enterprise Java programming model that VMware picked up in its August 2009 acquisition of SpringSource. The Spring Framework is in use by about 2 million developers worldwide as a lightweight programming environment to make applications portable across open-source and commercial application server environments. Read more on crn.com

Caspio – `Cloudy` online database platform to support online software development. One of the best features of Caspio is its “embed” feature which offers an embed code for a Caspio-based “datapage” much the same way that YouTube offers embed codes for its videos. Caspio handles blobs at the field level (in other words, there’s support for video, images, and other large binary objects) and supports SQL/API-based access to its databases. Caspio has a personal “version” that’s free but is limited to 2 data pages (essentially forms) and then starts at $40 per month for 10 datapages, 1 GB worth of data transfer and 1 GB of storage. There’s a corporate version that goes for $350 per month (more datapages, capacity, and “logins”) and several levels of subscription in-between. See how Caspio works or read more about this vendor on informationweek.com

Gigaspaces – Gigaspaces’ core product the Gigaspaces XAP is an enterprise-grade, end-to-end in-memory application server for deploying and dynamically scaling distributed applications. If an ISV or any IT organization needs to boost workload performance and has business-critical Java and .NET applications. that can be spread over a computational or data grid configuration, XAP can be a good option. GigaSpaces started as a firm that could manage a server’s local cache; it expanded to manage the combined cache of a cluster of servers, then figured out how to make that cache expandable by managing the cache as servers were added to the cluster. In its latest iteration, the GigaSpaces CEAP (Cloud Enablement Application Platform) makes application business logic elastic by managing its multiple moving parts in a shared memory system.The cloud-enabled platform allows “continuous scaling of application data and services. Think of Amazon style of SimpleDB scaling,” Nati Shalom, CTO and founder of GigaSpaces. Check out Gigaspaces.com and read the recent news brought to you by InformationWeek.com

OrangeScapeOrangeScape is one of the 10 global companies featured in Gartner’s ‘PaaS competitive landscape’ report and also has been featured in all the PaaS reports of Forrester.As an aPaaS provider, Orangescape Studio offers an UI similar to modern Excel application so the business users can design an application by capturing various aspects of the application declaratively in an XML-like format which is then executed by the proprietary Orangescape virtual machine. The core of the virtual machine is their main platform, which is nothing but a rules engine that works on a complex networked data model. Read more on CloudAve

Cordys – aPaaS vendor Delivering MashApps Cordys Process Factory (CPF) is a Web browser-based, integrated cloud environment for rapid Cloud Application Development. Cordys Process Factory allows users to use and sell Cloud Applications, and also subscribe for applications built by others in the Cloud Marketplace. All of this is achieved through visual modeling, without having to write code. Check out Cordys and read more on getApp.

There are other interesting PaaS providers such as Joyent, MuleSoft, CloudBees, Appistry and more, I will release another post on those later on this month so you are welcome to stay tuned with `I Am OnDemand`.

> > > > >   Choose Your PaaS Providers

Traditional ISV conversion to become a pure SaaS vendor should carefully plan its application deployment strategy. By learning the PaaS Market and selecting its relevant vendors in this market the traditional ISV will present a fast go-to-market and eventually a smoother conversion. Together with those benefites, I find that the ISV consideration of using a PaaS provider will make the smart ISV’s CTO to understand the strong lock-in to whichever PaaS providers the CTO will choose. This will make the CTO nervous as the lock-in feature on the On-Demand market is with no doubt more aggressive.

Check those important criteria to consider in evaluation PaaS vendor.

Learn more about PaaS vendor lock-in

To summarize I can say that no doubt that PaaS has an important part in the adoption of cloud computing by the ISVs and the IT organizations. The PaaS players are technology-rich companies, the market definitions and roles are not completely clear and it seems that PaaS evolve slower than the other two layers (i.e IaaS and PaaS). As in every evolving new market you can expect a wave of innovation and of hype as there today new business opportunities for startups companies, the leading software vendors and the IaaS giants.

Do you still have a lack of knowledge with basic market definitions? Check I Am OnDemand Terminology Page